Three Key Things Your Software Must Have to Schedule a PowerShell Script

When PowerShell, the command-line shell and scripting language developed by Microsoft, was first released in 2006, it was a game-changer for administrators and application developers, enabling them to work more efficiently with applications running on the Windows platform. In fact, PowerShell is now considered the standard for automation and administration of any Microsoft-related application and can now


Learn PowerShell with Microsoft MVP Thomas Lee (London)

MVP Systems Software and the JAMS Job Scheduler team will again be sponsoring Thomas Lee’s PowerShell PowerCamp London this October. Lee’s intensive, two-day, training regimen has helped scores of IT pros gain practical knowledge on Microsoft’s extensive administration framework. Find out more about PowerCamp on Thomas Lee’s blog and visit our site to learn more



PowerShell 3.0 Recap [Video]

PowerShell 3.0 is filled with many new features to administer Windows systems. We’ve supported the latest version since its release in September of 2012, but we know that not everyone has had an opportunity to kick the tires. So, we teamed up with PowerShell MVP Jeffery Hicks to show off some of 3.0’s most valuable




Still Deploying PowerShell Scripts Manually?

Note: This post was originally published in the February 2013 PowerShell.org TechLetter. The whole purpose of PowerShell is to automate tasks. So, why are some users still manually deploying scripts? And why are some organizations relying on one or two users to execute critical PowerShell scripts? The automation of PowerShell scripts is an important step


Power Scheduling in PowerShell 3.0

When people start looking at our enterprise job scheduler, they often ask “Aren’t many of the features of JAMS already available through PowerShell?”. The answer is “yes”. We embrace PowerShell and we are constantly seeking out ways to make JAMS fully accessible to it. Why? Microsoft has established and actively supports PowerShell as a standard


How to Execute a .bat File within a PowerShell Job

Most of the time, you run Windows batch files using the Command Execution Method, which replicates running them in a command prompt window (cmd.exe).  But, what if you need to perform additional processing within the same job and you are running that batch processing in PowerShell? You have several methods to launch Windows batch files